Healthy living

Adult immunisation schedule

The immunisations below are free through the state government and national immunisation program (NIP).

There are a number of different circumstances in which adults might be recommended additional vaccines.

You can read more about adult immunisations at the Australian Government Department of Health website (external site).

Table: Adult immunisation schedule
Eligible groups Disease covered
Pregnant women

When to get immunised

  • Any stage of every pregnancy

When to get immunised

  • Third trimester of every pregnancy
Aboriginal community

When to get immunised

  • Aboriginal people 15 years and over are recommended to get the influenza vaccine in late autumn (May or June) each year. However, it is never too late to get the vaccine. It's important to get a vaccine every year as the strains of influenza and the vaccine can change from year-to-year.

When to get immunised

  • Aboriginal people who are:
    • Medically at risk (any age)
    • 15 years and over
People aged 15 – 19

When to get immunised

Adults born after 1965

When to get immunised

  • At any time, especially before travelling overseas

*You need to have had two doses of the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR vaccine) to be protected.

Recent measles cases in WA were also traced back to people who travelled overseas and had only received one dose of the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine.

Find out about other immunisations before you travel.

Over 65s

When to get immunised

  • Annually – for best protection, it is recommended to get the influenza vaccine in late autumn (May or June) every year, as the strains offered in the vaccine can change from year to year. However, it is never too late to get the vaccine.

70-79
Medically at risk People with certain medical conditions or who are undergoing some medical treatments may have special vaccine requirements.

Speak to your doctor or health provider to learn about which vaccines are recommended for you.

Where can I get immunised?

Find out where you can get immunised.

Where to get help


Last reviewed: 21-03-2019
Acknowledgements

Public Health


This publication is provided for education and information purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical care. Information about a therapy, service, product or treatment does not imply endorsement and is not intended to replace advice from your healthcare professional. Readers should note that over time currency and completeness of the information may change. All users should seek advice from a qualified healthcare professional for a diagnosis and answers to their medical questions.

Photo of a women in her 30s/40s with a serious expression. Text: Have you been fully vaccinated against measles?