Healthy living

Year 8 immunisation program (video description)

00:03

Voiceover to background images of students arriving at school

Every parent wants the best for their child but as children grow into adolescence and behave with greater independence and less predictability, it's often difficult to know how we can best protect and guide them but one way we can continue to safeguard our children is to have them vaccinated and the reasons for doing it are well known.

00:23

Jane Di Giuseppi, parent, standing outside school entry

Because it stops diseases, coming, spreading around the community and we've got of rid of things like polio and whatever that used to be really, you know, widespread and terrible and we don't have it now.

00:34

Yenny Gallesvillos, parent, standing outside school entry

I'd prefer the injection to prevent rather than treat afterwards.

00:37

Mikaela Briot, student, standing outside school entry

I think it's really helpful in the prevention of, you know, everything that we're vaccinated against.

00:41

Bill Currie, parent, standing outside school entry

It's a preventative thing so it's like insurance. You don't think you need it at the time but it's just better to have.

00:48

Voiceover to background images of students gathering outside school

However, despite the documented benefits, some people don't vaccinate their children due to some common misconceptions…

00:56

Parveen Fatima, parent

If there's just one case of any ill effects from vaccination or anything, it just gets blown out of proportion.

01:01

Mari Karvinen, parent, standing outside school entry

And out of fear not always -- or ignorance, not always understanding the real ramifications.

01:07

Jane Di Giuseppi, parent, standing outside school entry

'Cause there's rumours going around that if you get vaccinated, you can get really sick.

01:11

Voiceover to background images of students gathering outside school

The fact is, vaccinations help defend against serious diseases that if caught their wild form can be dangerous and result in hospitalisation and even death.

Early childhood vaccinations protect against 16 vaccine preventable diseases; however, the level of immunity wanes over time, which is why the WA Health Department is offering a free booster vaccination program for year 8 students to ensure they remain protected.

01:40

Dr Paul Armstrong, Director of Communicable Disease Control Directorate, standing in school grounds

Early in the year, parents will receive an information pack which describes the vaccinations and the diseases those vaccinations protect against and also included in that pack will be a consent form that we'll ask parents to sign and send back in with their child to school.

01:55

Voiceover to background images of students gathering outside school

The adolescent vaccinations are booster doses of diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and chickenpox to guarantee immunity into adulthood plus there's an additional vaccine for HPV, or human papillomavirus, which is a disease many people are unaware of.

02:13

Tanya York, parent, standing outside school entry

Well, I don't think I could tell you a whole lot.

02:16

Mikaela Briot, student, standing outside school entry

I'm not sure; actually I don't know anything about that.

02:18

Shane Ray, parent, standing outside school entry

Is that the one they immunise girls for?

02:23

Voiceover to background images of students gathering outside school

HPV is a highly contagious infection that can be spread through sexual activity.

It affects both boys and girls and is associated with cancer of the throat, mouth and cervix.

Up to 80 per cent of the population will be infected with HPV at some time in their lives so it's important both girls and boys are vaccinated before they become sexually active.

Parents who don't vaccinate their children increase the risk of disease not only for their own children but for others throughout the community.

02:56

Bridget Ammon, parent, standing outside school entry

My kids were exposed through somebody who had – her girls had chickenpox, where I had had my elder one immunised but my youngest one who was 2 months got chickenpox and as a result, she's gone on to have shingles later in life as well, so I was very upset with that.

03:13

Voiceover to background images of students playing basketball

While Western Australia is generally protected, we still get outbreaks of vaccine preventable diseases like whooping cough and measles often because travellers bring these diseases in from countries where they still circulate.

If you're not vaccinated and catch a disease like chickenpox as an adult, the effects can be far more severe.

03:33

Bridget Ammon, parent, standing outside school entry

Infertility and death – two worst case scenarios, aside from the scarring and the fact that it makes you really, really sick.

03:41

Tanya York, parent, standing outside school entry

And it was incredibly severe, the kind of pain – he had the chickenpox occur on his eyelids and in his mouth.

03:49

Dr Paul Armstrong, Director of Communicable Disease Control Directorate, standing in school grounds

So it's really important that children get these vaccines, including the year 8 booster doses for the particular diseases.

03:56

Voiceover to background images of students playing basketball

Immunisation works and it benefits the whole community by minimising the spread of infectious and potentially fatal diseases.

04:04

Dr Paul Armstrong, Director of Communicable Disease Control Directorate, standing in school grounds

If I had one message for parents, it would be to please don't miss this opportunity to protect your child.

Look out for the information pack that will be coming to you early this year and sign the consent form and send it back in with your child.

04:17

Voiceover to background image of www.healthywa.wa.gov.au and Department of Health logo

For more information about the diseases protected against by the adolescent vaccinations, visit the Healthy WA website.


Acknowledgements
Public Health

This publication is provided for education and information purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical care. Information about a therapy, service, product or treatment does not imply endorsement and is not intended to replace advice from your healthcare professional. Readers should note that over time currency and completeness of the information may change. All users should seek advice from a qualified healthcare professional for a diagnosis and answers to their medical questions.

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