Healthy living

Community child health nurses

  • Community child health nurses, employed by WA Health, are registered nurses with qualifications in child and family health.
  • They are experienced professionals who have a variety of nursing and other qualifications.
  • Community child health nurses offer a range of services for families with babies and young children.
  • Our services are changing – find out more.

These services may be provided:

  • in your home
  • at the child health centre
  • other community venues.
Child and family health services

Community child health nurses provide a service in partnership with parents and carers of babies and young children up to the age of 4 years.

Community child health nurses:

  • assess baby and child health and development
  • provide ongoing support for families and can offer information about many aspects of parenting, maternal and family health and healthy lifestyles
  • provide information about immunisation and locations of free clinics in community health centres
  • act as a link between hospitals and the community, working with family GPs and other health professionals when necessary
  • work as part of a broader health team and can refer to:
    • Aboriginal and ethnic health workers
    • audiologists
    • dietitians
    • lactation consultants
    • medical officers
    • occupational therapists
    • paediatricians
    • physiotherapists
    • podiatrists
    • psychologists
    • speech therapists
    • social workers
    • specialised health educators.
Parenting groups and health education

Parenting groups conducted by community child health nurses provide an opportunity to meet other fathers and mothers, and share experiences.

Joining a parenting group is a way to find out about issues related to the age of your baby, as well as information on health and parenting.

For more information please contact the nurse at your nearest centre.

Working with the nurse

All children develop at different rates.

As parents are often closest to their child, they can be the first person to sense there is something not quite right.

Contact the community child health nurse or family GP if you have any concerns about your child’s:

  • health
  • development
  • behaviour.

The nurse can provide information on a range of issues including:

Don’t forget to bring your child’s personal health record, All About Me, to all of your meetings with the community child health nurse.

Child health centre locations

Soon after your baby is born, your child health nurse will contact you to make an appointment.

If you don't have an appointment, or have moved, you can find your nearest child health centre by using ‘Find a Health Service’ at the top of this page (on the right). Type ‘child health’ in the ‘keyword search’, and your suburb in ‘location field’, then click on the 'search’ button.

There are centres right around Western Australia. Most are open Monday to Friday, but some less often, and you usually need an appointment.

All services are free.

Ask for a free telephone interpreter if you need one.

Remember

  • Community child health nurses offer a range of services for families with babies and young children, including information about immunisation and locations of free clinics in community health centres.
  • Joining a parenting group is a way to find out about issues related to the age of your baby.

Acknowledgements

Child and Adolescent Health Service


This publication is provided for education and information purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical care. Information about a therapy, service, product or treatment does not imply endorsement and is not intended to replace advice from your healthcare professional. Readers should note that over time currency and completeness of the information may change. All users should seek advice from a qualified healthcare professional for a diagnosis and answers to their medical questions.

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